stevekimarts:

processes (2)


00.30.14 // via + © // 877
filed under: #steve kim #rb:art #q

Drawing with my current computer has become a nightmare. Every time I feel inspired, photoshop boycotts me. it keeps freezing and even the simplest actions like flipping canvas or saving my work can take minutes. And I hate it. So sorry for the lack of new art, but I’m planning to get a new computer soon - well when I have the money - so I can draw without cursing every 10 seconds. 


16.17.49 // 6
filed under: #personal

Anonymous: I love your Loki artwork. The one with the horn looking down is amazing :)

Thank you very much! Hopefully I’ll draw more Loki art in the future!


15.18.59 // 3
filed under: #anon #asks

When Van Gogh was a young man in his early twenties, he was in London studying to be a clergyman. He had no thought of being an artist at all. he sat in his cheap little room writing a letter to his younger brother in Holland, whom he loved very much. He looked out his window at a watery twilight, a thin lamppost, a star, and he said in his letter something like this: “it is so beautiful I must show you how it looks.” And then on his cheap ruled note paper, he made the most beautiful, tender, little drawing of it.

When I read this letter of Van Gogh’s it comforted me very much and seemed to throw a clear light on the whole road of Art. Before, I thought that to produce a work of painting or literature, you scowled and thought long and ponderously and weighed everything solemnly and learned everything that all artists had ever done aforetime, and what their influences and schools were, and you were extremely careful about *design* and *balance* and getting *interesting planes* into your painting, and avoided, with the most astringent severity, showing the faintest *academical* tendency, and were strictly modern. And so on and so on.

But the moment I read Van Gogh’s letter I knew what art was, and the creative impulse. It is a feeling of love and enthusiasm for something, and in a direct, simple, passionate and true way, you try to show this beauty in things to others, by drawing it.

And Van Gogh’s little drawing on the cheap note paper was a work of art because he loved the sky and the frail lamppost against it so seriously that he made the drawing with the most exquisite conscientiousness and care.

Brenda UelandIf You Want to Write: A Book about Art, Independence and Spirit (via raggedybearcat)


14.21.02 // via + © // 18689
filed under: #quotes #van gogh #on art

The Queen by kittrose

Guess who I’m drawing (again)


10.15.16 // 16
filed under: #wip #fanart #bb

powwowblog:

New work by @jamesjeanart for Fables.


06.08.46 // via + © // 882
filed under: #rb: art #fables #james jean #comics

l-e-i-n-t-h:

Sammy by kittrose

Game of Thrones    portraits

How to help out your favorite artists when you don’t have any money

katedrawscomics:

3liza:

I post something like this about once a year, because I get a lot of messages from people who enjoy my art but feel guilty about not buying things from my store or subscribing on Patreon or getting things from my wishlist, etc. You really don’t need to do ANY of those things to help us out! Eyeballs on artwork is what we want, and just that is really helpful. But there are lots of other, free things you can do, if you want to, that will help us.

  • You can reblog our work, with credit! Tumblr, Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook, showing people next to you in class or at the library, whatever. The more you reblog our stuff, any kind of stuff, and especially if it has a name and/or link attached, the more followers we get, the happier we are, and the easier we can sell art and pay rent. This is such a vital part of our continued existence and it is difficult to overstate how grateful we are when it happens.

  • You can like, comment, subscribe on Youtube, reply on Twitter, and generally make our little numbers go up. Even if you don’t want a drawing on your blog, hitting “Like” helps. If people are browsing your liked posts (if you have this option available in your sidebar or in a separate page) they will see our work. Additionally, higher note counts translate instantly to “more worthy of being looked at” when parsed by an idle, browsing brain. That’s the price of being a member of a social species, and it stinks because it doesn’t reflect “quality” or “innate value” of art, whatever that is, but a post with 4 digit notes is going to get more positive regard than a post with a 2 digit notecount. And really, it makes sense. If lots of people like a thing, it is likely, if only statistically, that you will too. 

  • You can talk about your favorite artists to your friends. A lot of us idle on skype and irc all day, talking about new album releases and games and twitter beef. It doesn’t occur to a lot of us to talk about how so-and-so just did a cartoon of a fat bird that is making our day slightly better, but that URL pastes just as easily into the chat as any other. Don’t be annoying about it, but like Homeland Security always says, if you see something, say something!

  • You can look at/click the ads on our websites. You can disable AdBlock on our websites, too. I have two little Project Wonderful boxes at the top of my blog. They pay me very little per day, but when I need $20 to stop an overdraft fee or buy a food, Project Wonderful has my back. This has happened about a dozen times, enough to teach me the value of having that last, tiny bit of cash just slowly snowballing in the background.

There is probably other stuff that I’m forgetting, so please feel free to reblog and add them.

also personally I am nuts about getting comments on the site because people talking about the comic is the actual BEST


13.13.21 // via + © // 3894
filed under: #yes! #advice
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